Palm Sunday

Preparing for Palm Sunday as an all-in (my preferred, more all-encompassing term for intergenerational) worship, I wanted to create a space that would give voice to the clamour of voices in our own lives by moving from lots of noise and movement to a stiller listening which would ready us for the silence and shadows that deepen as we move through Holy Week.

PREPARATION

The sanctuary can be decorated with Palm fronds or these can be brought in during the singing of a processional hymn like All glory, laud and honour (Together in Song 333). Stones should also be strewn around the altar to create the scene of the Gospel reading.

Palm fronds sufficient for the average number of children attending your service should be cut out of light green cardboard and given to children/volunteers seated throughout the sanctuary (there are plenty of easy templates available through Google search). These will be used in making worship a little more interactive for children, as well as for the prayers of praise later in the service.

WELCOME

This or some other introduction:

Today, Palm Sunday,  marks the beginning of Holy Week. This is the day when Jesus weeps over Jerusalem and then enters it on a donkey as a person of peace rather than a rising power. Yet, in spite of his humble entry, he is hailed by the crowd who recognise him as being of God and praise him with loud hosannas. Only weeks later, they will be baying for his blood with shouts of “Crucify him.”

Our King is coming.
And so, we cry from our hearts,
“Hosanna. Save us!”

If it has not been sung as a processional hymn, TiS 333 is sung now.

CALL TO WORSHIP – CLAP YOUR HANDS

A rap/ rhyme with clapping and verbal responses. The leader should prepare the congregation for the expected actions which are either a repetition of the words “when the Lord comes” or three claps following any other phrase. The overall effect should be a fairly fast, fun, flowing call to worship in which people of all ages can participate. It really doesn’t need to be perfect, just loud! Here’s a (poor) example of the rhythm:

Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Everyone             (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)

All you people (clap, clap, clap)
Shout to God (clap, clap, clap)
With loud songs (clap, clap, clap)
Songs of joy (clap, clap, clap)

When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

We’ll shout and sing (clap, clap, clap)
Fear no earthly thing (clap, clap, clap)
Give Him everything (clap, clap, clap)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Everyone             (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)

All you people (clap, clap, clap)
Shout to God (clap, clap, clap)
With loud songs (clap, clap, clap)
Songs of joy (clap, clap, clap)

When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

We’ll call His name (clap, clap, clap)
Proclaim the fame (clap, clap, clap)
Of He who stays the same (clap, clap, clap)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Everyone             (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)

All you people (clap, clap, clap)
Shout to God (clap, clap, clap)
With loud songs (clap, clap, clap)
Songs of joy (clap, clap, clap)

When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

See Him enter in (clap, clap, clap)
Our humble King (clap, clap, clap)
Let us shout and sing (clap, clap, clap)
When the Lord comes (when the Lord comes)

Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)
Everyone             (clap, clap, clap)
Clap your hands (clap, clap, clap)

All you people (clap, clap, clap)
Shout to God (clap, clap, clap)
With loud songs (clap, clap, clap)
Songs of joy (clap, clap, clap)

SONGS OF JOY

A medley of two or three choruses are sung with recurring words. The children are invited to wave their (cardboard) palm leaves in the air every time they hear those chosen words e.g. “hosanna” and “glory” sung. I would suggest Hosanna in the highest and Glory, glory in the highest and maybe the “laughing song” for the children in particular.

PALM PRAYERS (AND OFFERTORY)

In groups of 5 or 6, mixed group of adults and children write down on a (cardboard) Palm leaf some of the things that they would like to praise God for. When sufficient time has been given, one of the choruses above can be sung through again as children bring their “palms” forward and scatter them among the rocks at the altar as a symbol of bringing their prayers of praise to God. The offertory can also be collected at this time as an act of adoration.

GOSPEL READING: LUKE 19:28-40

Before this familiar story is read, set the scene by picking up one of the stones and holding it to your ear. Then look at it quizzically, tell everyone to shhhhhhhh, and listen again. Say, “In today’s story, Jesus tells the Pharisees that even if the people who were singing songs of praise to him were quiet, the stones would shout out. Can you help me find a stone that speaks?”

Encourage the children to help you look – or rather listen! – for one that talks. When you’ve exhausted all the options, suggest that maybe they’re keeping quiet because there are so many other voices in our lives that we’re always listening to. Ask them whose voices these may be.

After a short time of sharing, say, “So many voices. In our story from Luke today there are a lot of voices too. Maybe we can listen together and count how many people are talking.”

The story is read.

With the congregation, try to identify the “voices.” I count 5 that I will be talking about in the time of meditation:

  • Jesus – the voice of authority/instruction 
  • The colt’s owners – the voice of ownership/interrogation   
  • The two disciples – the voice of imitation/obedience
  • The voice of the multitude – the voice of praise/expectation
  • The Pharisees – the voice of criticism/offence 

“SILENT” PRAYER

To be offered slowly, gently.

O Still Point of our Turning World,
Let us be aware of You in silence this day.
Let us not be distracted by the clamour of every thought
But let us sit – still and safe –
In the certainty of Your presence
And the assurance of Your love.

Let us trust that You are enough
And we are enough
And it is enough just to be here,
Just as we are.

Free us from the voices that would have us believe otherwise:
That would lead us away,
That demand we get back to the busyness of our day,
That question our worth,
That criticise our efforts,
That worry us and wear us down.

In this moment,
May our hearts be still,
Our minds uncluttered,
Our faces unmasked,
Our spirits at ease.

Be still in the silence and aware of the Love with and within you….

A time of silence is observed – just allow it to expand as long as is comfortable. Then ….  

May the peace of the Lord be with You.
And also with you.

The peace is shared.

PALM CROSS ACTIVITY

As people return to their seats, the children can be invited to make palm crosses at the table – they will probably need assistance, or, at the very least, company.

https://www.catholicicing.com/how-to-fold-a-palm-cross-in-10-easy-steps/

MEDITATION/REFLECTION

PRAYERS FOR THE WORLD

(An adaptation of a prayer by Tess Ward)

Great God whose love can never be silenced
Hold us in Your heart when the noise of our busyness is hushed:
After the gunfire of war, the stillness of the fallen.
After the crying of the baby, the contentment of sleep.
After the gossiping of tongues, the wounded heart of the one that is reviled.
After laughter with friends, the void of solitude.
After the hymns have been sung, the watchful waiting of an empty church.
After the beloved voice of those dear to us, the nothingness with which we are faced when they are gone. 

Be with those who are afraid of the stillness that this day may hold,
With those for whom quiet is equated with loneliness or loss,
With those who know silence to be the calm before the storm of violence and abuse erupts,
With those who feel so voiceless in their situation that they wish the stones would cry out on their behalf.
Great God whose love can never be silenced
Hold them in Your heart.
Amen.

TiS 585 I heard the voice of Jesus say is sung

BENEDICTION

In the clamour of this day
grant us a stillness of seeing, O God.
In the conflicting voices of our hearts,
grant us a calmness of hearing.
Let our seeing and hearing,
our words and our actions,
be rooted in the silent certainty of Your presence.
And, in our certainty let us cry out,
“Hosanna. Save us!”
that the world may be blessed
By the love of the Father,
The Life of the Son,
And the leading of the still, small voice of the Spirit.
Amen.

TiS 779 May the feet or some other quiet song of blessing is sung

Day Seven: Under Whose Authority?

Psalm 85:1-2, 8-13
Ezekiel 36:24-28;
Mark 11:27-33

The Gospel reading for this day confronts us with a question that Jesus actually refused to answer,

By what authority are you doing these things? … And who gave you the authority to do this?”
Mark 11:28.

The question comes after two significant events that threaten the power dynamics and social hierarchy in Jerusalem:

  1. Jesus entering the holy city peaceably on the back of a colt and being welcomed by the common people, to the cry of “Hosanna” which means “save us,” who see being fulfilled before them Zechariah’s prophecy (9:9) that Zion’s King would come to them mounted on the foal of a donkey.
  2. Jesus forcefully expelling the corrupt traders and money lenders from the temple to return it to a place of prayer. This action is particularly important in light of Malachi’s prophecy as it testifies to Jesus’ true identity and authority: “suddenly the Lord you are seeking will come to his temple … But who can endure the day of his coming? … For he will be like a refiner’s fire or a launderer’s soap” (Malachi 3:1-2).

The question is not asked by the common people but by those who have religious and political power over them – the chief priests, teachers of the law, and elders of the Sanhedrin (the Jewish ruling council).

Make a list of all of the “voices” that have power and influence in your life. Remember to include those from the past who still have an impact on how you think and act today.

Next to each “voice,” simply plus a “+” “-” or “?” as you reflect on whether it has a positive, negative, or neutral impact on who you are and what you do.

Finally, number the list in order of importance with 1 having the greatest influence, 2 the next etc. 

Jesus responds. Not doing so would have been highly disrespectful, and I’m sure that his mother had brought him up right.

But he doesn’t answer the question that they have asked, for his actions themselves have indicated his true identity and the source of his authority.

Instead, he turns the tables by asking them a question about the source of John’s authority to baptise in the name of God that they cannot possibly answer without further damaging their credibility among the people.

The discussion ends in deadlock. Those in power are forced to proclaim, “We do not know” (Mark 11:33a).

Often we do not know the credentials of those who seek to influence us. Nor do we truly know the voices that drive them – their hidden ambitions, their deepest longings, their fears and insecurities. Often we just follow.

But this season points us to the Ultimate Authority in our lives – our Advent God who pronounces us beloved and holy and well that we might never live like fools again (Psalm 85:8).

How does God’s authority compare to the other “voices” in your life?

Where did it rank on your list?

As others look at your choices and actions, would they question where your authority comes from or would they long to know the One who leads you more intimately?

As the first week of Advent comes to an end, you may want to sit for a while with the words from Ezekiel 36:24-28 which speak of how God exercises God’s authority – to gather, to clean, to give, to remove, to make possible, to be ours.

Do you, truly, long to be God’s?